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All the hidden eggs, ties to 'X-Men' and more in 'Logan'

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All the hidden eggs, ties to 'X-Men' and more in 'Logan'

For the ninth time, Jackman takes on the mantel of the Wolverine and, for the ninth time, does an exceptional job portraying him. I grew up as a teen in the 90s and for me, the X-Men cartoon on Fox was a main staple of my Saturday mornings. But the biggest block I've had - I'm willing to take the heat for it - is that, I can never get past, being a writer for these movies as well, that Logan is the least narcissistic of all the superheroes, any kind I can think of - Marvel, DC or anywhere else.

In fact, some fans might argue that Logan doesn't do enough to fix the continuity problems of the X-Men movie franchise, as the film only acknowledges some basic cursory ties to the other X-Men and/or Wolverine films in the franchise.

However, during Facebook Live session and interviews, Logan star stood firm that the latest installment will be his last film as Wolverine. Old, bitter, and dying, Logan works as a limousine driver making a living to care for himself and a senile Charles Xavier, also known as Professor X (Patrick Stewart). Whatever happened must've been horrific because Charles is a broken man, which has nothing to do with the wheelchair he uses. But the work done on seamlessly integrating them into Logan is nothing short of awesome. Their domestic malaise is interrupted by the arrival of a little girl who doesn't speak but does have unsafe powers and a coterie of bad guys on her trail.

This isn't Logan in his prime. Together, they represent three generations of mutants: some related by blood, some not, but all linked by their bond as mutants. It takes so long, the man (whom the audience can hear pleading for his life) is shot and killed before our hero can jump in to save the day. Of course I loved the movie and highly recommend seeing it, but the reasoning for that was something I felt deserved a more little more exposition.

"Logan" falters a bit around the 75-95 percent mark when we're suddenly introduced to a bunch of undeveloped new characters and the film has to rely on its less-than-impressive conflict with the villains. Armed men in black uniforms are chasing a Mexican girl across the U.S.

"We can not, once again, explore the Erik/Charles dynamic", she said, adding that while the shift is "both liberating and makes me nervous", for her "it's mostly liberating" because "there are other stories to tell". We see the broken bodies of our superheroes laid bare, we feel the hard emotional reality of trying to care for an elderly loved one who has difficulty understanding his own condition and can snap in unusual ways at any moment, and we know that nothing can last forever, not even our greatest heroes. I highly recommend everyone read it.

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