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Boston Marathon 2017 How Did Runners from Avon Do

One of the biggest stories from the 2017 Boston Marathon: how Kathrine Switzer competed in the race again, 50 years after her historic first run.

In the women's competition, runners to watch include Kenya's Gladys Cherono, who won the 2015 Berlin Marathon, and Edna Kiplagat, who finished second in Chicago past year.

The Boston Marathon will retire Bib No. 261 in honor of Kathrine Switzer.

Switzer finished anyway, and came back eight more times.

Switzer embraced her destiny for her 50th anniversary race and focused on starting healthy and finishing strong.

As Switzer recalled, her coach Arnie Briggs dissuaded her from even trying the marathon.

In the women's race, Kiplagat conjured a similarly decisive burst over the closing stages to claim the race for the first time. Included in those were members of the 261 Fearless Boston Marathon Team, an organisation Switzer founded after racing in 1967 to empower women in athletics. Now with the world behind him, Sanchez, who told Runner's World he doesn't even like to run, made a decision to take on his biggest athletic challenge yet - the marathon.

"You would never find it", Switzer told the Boston Globe. Marathon participants with disabilities are allowed to be accompanied by people who can assist them if needed.

"I turned to Arnie and said, 'I'm going to finish this race on my hands and my knees if I have to, '" she said.

Aside from the Kenyan's impressive time in soaring temperatures in Boston, Kirui's extraordinary leg definition left a number of spectators stumped.

So she entered the marathon, following all the proper procedures and just, well, neglecting to mention she was female. "We have the podium for both men and women, so the future is great". And the race director [Jock Semple] was on the truck and the guys were teasing him.

"He said, 'No dame ever ran no marathon, '" she said. "I just wanted to workout to become the person I used to be". I was terrified. I was scared.

Inspired onlookers rushed to congratulate Granville, giving him hugs and cheering him on as he rushed to complete the race. She was yelling for everyone to yell for me. "I wasn't trying to break any barriers", Switzer, now 70, told SELF a year ago. The race resonated far beyond a footnote in the record books when an official tried to force her from the course after a few miles.

American Jordan Hasay, making her first run at the 26.2-mile distance, was third and Desi Linden was fourth - the first time since 1991 that two USA women have finished in the top four. In the past, the nine-year-veteran has run the Boston, Chicago, Detroit and NY marathons using a hand-bike, according to WCVB.

Before the race, she wrote on Facebook: "Today is the race of my life".

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